DST Forever!

DST Fall

Twice a year our bodies adjust to the abrupt change of Daylight Saving Time. In the fall, we “gain” the hour “lost” last spring. Although we welcome the additional hour of sleep, it takes days to readjust.

Standard Time is like the weather—everyone complains about it, but no one does anything about it! In six months, we will revisit the debate yet again.

Here’s my simple plan: Daylight Saving Time Forever! Yes, there are more important issues in the world, but this is one we could easily fix.

Quit messing around with the calendar and clock. I’ll gladly trade an hour of sunlight in the morning for an additional hour in the evening. And no one would miss the semiannual shock to our biological clocks.

I’m sure Congress will get right on it, along with a balanced budget, reduced deficit, and funded entitlements. On second thought, I’ll plan to “Spring forward one hour” again next March.

Lessons Politicians Teach our Children

While watching political-attack ads and debates on TV , I began to reflect on the lessons that politicians of all parties are teaching our children on-air.

  • If you cannot say something nice, say nothing at all something mean, nasty, hurtful, hateful, defamatory, and derogatory. Interrupt others because your opinion is more important.
  • Never take responsibility for your own actions. Always blame someone else for your faults and failures.
  • Take credit for others’ achievements. Never recognize anyone else’s contributions. Pride is for winners and humility for losers.  
  • Lie. Lie BIG. The bigger the lie, the better the lie. Lie more when someone responds with the truth.
  • Call others liars. If someone does not agree with your version of the truth, dismiss their opinions as fake news or false delusions.
  • Bully people. Use your power and position to torment and tyrannize other children.
  • Appearance is more important than substance and looks supersede character.
  • Look out for #1. Treat everyone else like, well, #2.
  • Finally, never trust national media outlets or local blog authors.

The Wisdom of Samwise Gamgee

It’s like in the great stories, Mr. Frodo, the ones that really mattered. Full of darkness and danger they were, and sometimes you didn’t want to know the end, because how could the end be happy? How could the world go back to the way it was when so much bad had happened?

But in the end, it’s only a passing thing, this shadow. Even darkness must pass. A new day will come, and when the sun shines, it will shine out the clearer. Those were the stories that stayed with you, that meant something, even if you were too small to understand why.

But I think, Mr. Frodo, I do understand. I know now. Folk in those stories had lots of chances of turning back. Only they didn’t, because they were holding on to something. That there’s some good in this world, Mr. Frodo. And it’s worth fighting for.

“The Lord of the Rings: The Two Towers” by Newline Cinemas

Classic Film Lovers

Recently, I accidentally joined the Classic Film Lovers Facebook Group. I must have clicked when I meant to swipe. Regardless, I now belong to a group of 27,276 devotees of old movies.

I don’t like old movies.

Recent, riveting discussions debated the merits of Catherine Deneuve versus Jacqueline Bissett, Cary Grant versus Jack Lemmon, and Westworld (1973) versus Westworld (2016). I have no opinion on any of these matters; however, I enjoy the posts.

In part, the passionate opinions of the participants intrigue me. Some people out there really LOVE classic films. They ardently champion various films, actors, and genres.

However, no one feels a need to denigrate another’s opinion. Whether you’re a Catherine Deneuve or a Jacqueline Bisset fan, it’s all good. Let’s agree Cary Grant and Jack Lemmon were both great actors. Westworld (1973) or Westworld (2016)? Enjoy them both!

Compare and contrast the attitudes of my Classic Film Lovers pals to the rest of Facebook. Someone recently shared that everyone on social media is walking around with two facts and a baseball bat. We defend our opinions with zealous fervor and demonize others’ ideas with spiteful glee.

In his classic book, The Seven Habits of Highly Effective People, Stephen Covey advised, “Seek first to understand, then to be understood.” This is a timely principle in the midst of a polarizing, political season.

Listen and reflect rather than ignore and react. Who knows, we all might learn something along the way.  

Meanwhile, I remain a proud member of the Classic Film Lovers Facebook Group. Does anyone know how to stream “Casablanca?” Here’s looking at you, kid!