Pi Day

This Sunday the United States observes Pi Day. In numeric form, March 14 is 3.14, which forms the first three digits of the mathematical constant of π. The symbol represents the ratio of a circle’s circumference to its diameter. Don’t ask me to expound on the topic—I’ve already told you more than I know!

Pi Day was first observed in 1988 by Larry Shaw at the San Francisco Exploratorium. In 2009, the US House of Representatives passed a resolution observing March 14 as National Pi Day.

I double-majored in History and Religion, so math is not my strong suit. However, the mathematical underpinnings of the cosmos fascinate me. The Creator crafted the universe to interrelate in fantastical ways that humanity continues to discover.

The Almighty’s fingerprints cover creation: from quantum mechanics to cosmological calculations, from subatomic particles to expanding galaxies, from mathematical equations to Shakespearean sonnets, from a baby’s cry to a senior’s sigh . . . God is with us.

Psalm 19:1 reminds us, “The heavens declare the glory of God; the skies proclaim the work of his hands.”

This Sunday celebrate Pi and eat some pie. Then join us for worship online or onsite at Northside Church as we declare, “Our God is an awesome God!”

1 thought on “Pi Day

  1. Thanks for this great post! It is fascinating to me to see how math and science both reveal so clearly the overwhelming evidence of design and thus point to the Designer! Based on some of your comments here, I suspect you and I enjoy reading some of the same authors and listening to the experts on these sorts of matters.

    Like

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